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Totoo ba na dating sa gobyerno ang ilang malalaking kumpanya tulad ng PLDT and MWSS?

PHC-jhenro

Forum Veteran
sus! ngayon nyo lang nalaman yan? tagal na nyan! kinalimutan mo pa shell at petron dati pinas may ari nyan binenta din kuno sa pribado pero baka di nyo alam baka share holder din sila ng lahat ng yun para may kita sila lagi ..benta kuno lang yan pero totoo baka sila pa may malaking share ngayon dyan ! magnanakaw kaya mga Aquino at cojuanco , search nyo sa google di lang yan pag mamay ari ng pinas noon , marami pa , pero nawala bigla mula umupo demonya na matandang cojuaco aquino
 

awinahe

Forum Veteran
ngayon, all the friends of duterte get everything (like villar, uy, go) and even the chinese get our sea and jobs!!
 
They had there chances 3 decades ago... Actually monopoly isn't that bad, specially sa mga ganyan bagay like energy, water, communications at transportation. Pero masyado na silang spoiled dahil sa consumer based economy natin thanks to our stable economy with the help of our OFW sending us foreign money.
 

awinahe

Forum Veteran
Any information po about sa sinasabi para maging healthy ung topic, thanks
no time now for research now, but you are the one in the first place who makes a thread without any real information, just a caricature taken probably from FB so....
 

-Kyle-

Honorary Poster
no time now for research now, but you are the one in the first place who makes a thread without any real information, just a caricature taken probably from FB so....
Nag tatanong kasi ako sa thread sir so baka may mag bigay ng info about sa nakita ko, and isa ka sa nag comment so hiningan kita ng source about sa sianabi para naman maging informative ung topic.
 

awinahe

Forum Veteran
Kung wala ka ma bibigay na info about sa sinabi mo sir labas nalang po kayo dito.
First I said I had no time... I did not say I have nothing to say!
2nd: you are the one making this thread with no information and you just bully people
3rd being the Thread starter, you should be the one providing info and feeding your thread first in order to keep it alive
4th I got a little time so I will just give you some info about Dennys Uy, the biggest oligarch since duterte came to power and a close friend/ally of him:

Davao connections
Few men have had a more spectacular rise than Dennis Uy.
Uy, a 45-year-old third-generation Chinese-Filipino from Davao del Norte, is the son of provincial traders who dealt in copra, maize and bananas. As he described in an interview with Nikkei in 2017, Uy met Duterte in Davao city, where he was mayor for over two decades. The men became friends. "He is a mentor in life [and] in leadership," Uy said of Duterte.
Uy built Phoenix Petroleum Philippines, his fuel company, into one of the largest in the country, capable of going head-to-head with Chevron. He also expanded his business into shipping and logistics. By 2016, Uy was one of Duterte's top presidential campaign donors. The next year, Duterte rang the bell at the Philippine Stock Exchange on the 10th anniversary of Phoenix going public. Uy and Duterte patted each other on the shoulders and traded effusive public compliments.
Filipino businessman Dennis Uy, center, sits between conglomerate Ayala's chairman and chief executive, Jaime Augusto Zobel de Ayala, left, and banking institution ING's Philippine head, Hans Sicat, right, at a Bloomberg event. © Getty Images

Since then, Uy has embarked on a head-spinning acquisition spree: convenience stores, a digital startup, a bakery chain, a Ferrari dealership, water utilities and a casino franchise. On top of all that, he gained rights to develop a 177-hectare multiuse city with office buildings, high-end retail outlets, sport centers and a resort, rising from a former American air base 90 km north of Manila.
Uy has racked up directorates and seats on the boards of companies, many of them owned by old-money oligarchs eager to associate with a man so closely linked with Duterte. Before Duterte became president, Uy was on the board of three public companies. By 2019, that number had shot up to 27. This year, he debuted on Forbes' list of the richest Filipinos at number 22. He has, in the past, denied using his personal relationship with Duterte for economic gain. Uy did not respond to multiple requests for an interview for this article.
Even though Uy projects an image of soft-spoken, provincial humility, one tycoon who has had dealings with him described a man fond of ostentatious displays of wealth and with a penchant for sports cars and other luxuries.
"He has a Richard Mille watch that you should not be wearing when you've got so much debt to the banks," he said, referencing timepieces that sell for six figures. He wants to be a "big shot," the tycoon said. "He wants to be the next taipan."
His rush to the top has been fueled partly by borrowing. Uy is estimated by Forbes Asia to have amassed around $2 billion in debt.
Uy's next venture takes him into a sector that has long suffered from the concentration of power in the Philippines' political and business communities: telecommunications. Dominated by two companies headed by the country's richest families -- the Zobel de Ayala family, who are majority stakeholders of Globe Telecom, and the tycoon Manuel V. Pangilinan of Smart Communications -- the industry has long been a cautionary tale of regulatory capture, stifled competition and the power of the oligarchy.

In 2016, at the start of Duterte's presidency, telecommunications service in the Philippines was a hair-pulling combination of dropped calls, webpages that struggled to load, unstable connections and buffering video broken up by brief spells of pixelated images. The poor service was a drag on businesses dependent on internet services. In Asia, the only country with slower service than the Philippines was Afghanistan, and access costs more than triple the global average.

Duterte railed against the companies, referring to them as a price-controlling cartel and threatening to break up the duopoly with foreign competition. The telcos responded to the threats and speeds doubled within three years, but the Duterte administration pressed on with the promise of a third telco anyway.

In the final round of bidding for the third license, a joint venture between Dennis Uy's company, Mislatel -- now known as Dito Telecommunity -- and the Chinese government-backed You must register or login to view this. remained as the sole contender. Mislatel won the deal despite Uy having little or no experience in telecommunications. Critics cried foul, alleging that some of Duterte's closest political associates had been spotted riding in Uy's private jets and summering in his luxury mountain villa, and that they had sped up the bidding process.

"As it is, it's now oozing with preferential treatment and, at worst, cronyism," Antonio Trillanes IV, a former senator and vocal critic of Duterte, said of the selection shortly after the announcement of Mislatel's win.


Ronald Mendoza, dean at the School of Government at the Ateneo de Manila University, said that the bidding process lacked transparency and the ultimate outcome -- that a company "very, very much linked to the Duterte administration" emerged in the final stage as the sole contender -- is "arguably the creation of yet another powerful force of economic concentration."

The telco episode appeared to have traded on political favoritism and rent-seeking, the same currency used by the existing telco companies, which resulted in the dismal state of Philippine telecommunications.

The deal is not likely to be seen as a signal that change has come, Mendoza said. "In fact, what that episode signaled is more of the same."

One businessman with knowledge of the sector had a different interpretation -- that Uy was doing Duterte a favor. "The next five years is not, in any form, going to be a good investment for anyone," he said. "Not for China Telecom, not for decades. But Dennis had to do it, because there's going to be a lot of egg on the president's face if the third telco project didn't happen."

Payback

As fellow Davao native Dennis Uy makes his name nationally, government funds are flooding into Duterte's home province. Between 2016 to 2017, the budget for the Department of Public Works and Highways Region XI, which encompasses Duterte's stronghold of Davao city, Davao del Norte, Davao del Sur and Davao Oriental, increased by over 100%. By comparison, other regions have had their DPWH numbers flatline, and the national average increased by 31%.

Backhoes, bulldozers and dump trucks are parked up on the sides of the roads next to piles of gravel and rolls of geotextile. Men with their faces wrapped in T-shirts to keep off the sun hoist scaffolding and sacks of cement onto their shoulders at dozens of public and private construction sites scattered across Davao city."


This informative article is long so if really you want to be enlightened, just read it here:
You must register or login to view this.
 

-Kyle-

Honorary Poster
First I said I had no time... I did not say I have nothing to say!
2nd: you are the one making this thread with no information and you just bully people
3rd being the Thread starter, you should be the one providing info and feeding your thread first in order to keep it alive
4th I got a little time so I will just give you some info about Dennys Uy, the biggest oligarch since duterte came to power and a close friend/ally of him:

Davao connections
Few men have had a more spectacular rise than Dennis Uy.
Uy, a 45-year-old third-generation Chinese-Filipino from Davao del Norte, is the son of provincial traders who dealt in copra, maize and bananas. As he described in an interview with Nikkei in 2017, Uy met Duterte in Davao city, where he was mayor for over two decades. The men became friends. "He is a mentor in life [and] in leadership," Uy said of Duterte.
Uy built Phoenix Petroleum Philippines, his fuel company, into one of the largest in the country, capable of going head-to-head with Chevron. He also expanded his business into shipping and logistics. By 2016, Uy was one of Duterte's top presidential campaign donors. The next year, Duterte rang the bell at the Philippine Stock Exchange on the 10th anniversary of Phoenix going public. Uy and Duterte patted each other on the shoulders and traded effusive public compliments.
Filipino businessman Dennis Uy, center, sits between conglomerate Ayala's chairman and chief executive, Jaime Augusto Zobel de Ayala, left, and banking institution ING's Philippine head, Hans Sicat, right, at a Bloomberg event. © Getty Images

Since then, Uy has embarked on a head-spinning acquisition spree: convenience stores, a digital startup, a bakery chain, a Ferrari dealership, water utilities and a casino franchise. On top of all that, he gained rights to develop a 177-hectare multiuse city with office buildings, high-end retail outlets, sport centers and a resort, rising from a former American air base 90 km north of Manila.
Uy has racked up directorates and seats on the boards of companies, many of them owned by old-money oligarchs eager to associate with a man so closely linked with Duterte. Before Duterte became president, Uy was on the board of three public companies. By 2019, that number had shot up to 27. This year, he debuted on Forbes' list of the richest Filipinos at number 22. He has, in the past, denied using his personal relationship with Duterte for economic gain. Uy did not respond to multiple requests for an interview for this article.
Even though Uy projects an image of soft-spoken, provincial humility, one tycoon who has had dealings with him described a man fond of ostentatious displays of wealth and with a penchant for sports cars and other luxuries.
"He has a Richard Mille watch that you should not be wearing when you've got so much debt to the banks," he said, referencing timepieces that sell for six figures. He wants to be a "big shot," the tycoon said. "He wants to be the next taipan."
His rush to the top has been fueled partly by borrowing. Uy is estimated by Forbes Asia to have amassed around $2 billion in debt.
Uy's next venture takes him into a sector that has long suffered from the concentration of power in the Philippines' political and business communities: telecommunications. Dominated by two companies headed by the country's richest families -- the Zobel de Ayala family, who are majority stakeholders of Globe Telecom, and the tycoon Manuel V. Pangilinan of Smart Communications -- the industry has long been a cautionary tale of regulatory capture, stifled competition and the power of the oligarchy.

In 2016, at the start of Duterte's presidency, telecommunications service in the Philippines was a hair-pulling combination of dropped calls, webpages that struggled to load, unstable connections and buffering video broken up by brief spells of pixelated images. The poor service was a drag on businesses dependent on internet services. In Asia, the only country with slower service than the Philippines was Afghanistan, and access costs more than triple the global average.

Duterte railed against the companies, referring to them as a price-controlling cartel and threatening to break up the duopoly with foreign competition. The telcos responded to the threats and speeds doubled within three years, but the Duterte administration pressed on with the promise of a third telco anyway.

In the final round of bidding for the third license, a joint venture between Dennis Uy's company, Mislatel -- now known as Dito Telecommunity -- and the Chinese government-backed You must register or login to view this. remained as the sole contender. Mislatel won the deal despite Uy having little or no experience in telecommunications. Critics cried foul, alleging that some of Duterte's closest political associates had been spotted riding in Uy's private jets and summering in his luxury mountain villa, and that they had sped up the bidding process.

"As it is, it's now oozing with preferential treatment and, at worst, cronyism," Antonio Trillanes IV, a former senator and vocal critic of Duterte, said of the selection shortly after the announcement of Mislatel's win.


Ronald Mendoza, dean at the School of Government at the Ateneo de Manila University, said that the bidding process lacked transparency and the ultimate outcome -- that a company "very, very much linked to the Duterte administration" emerged in the final stage as the sole contender -- is "arguably the creation of yet another powerful force of economic concentration."

The telco episode appeared to have traded on political favoritism and rent-seeking, the same currency used by the existing telco companies, which resulted in the dismal state of Philippine telecommunications.

The deal is not likely to be seen as a signal that change has come, Mendoza said. "In fact, what that episode signaled is more of the same."

One businessman with knowledge of the sector had a different interpretation -- that Uy was doing Duterte a favor. "The next five years is not, in any form, going to be a good investment for anyone," he said. "Not for China Telecom, not for decades. But Dennis had to do it, because there's going to be a lot of egg on the president's face if the third telco project didn't happen."

Payback

As fellow Davao native Dennis Uy makes his name nationally, government funds are flooding into Duterte's home province. Between 2016 to 2017, the budget for the Department of Public Works and Highways Region XI, which encompasses Duterte's stronghold of Davao city, Davao del Norte, Davao del Sur and Davao Oriental, increased by over 100%. By comparison, other regions have had their DPWH numbers flatline, and the national average increased by 31%.

Backhoes, bulldozers and dump trucks are parked up on the sides of the roads next to piles of gravel and rolls of geotextile. Men with their faces wrapped in T-shirts to keep off the sun hoist scaffolding and sacks of cement onto their shoulders at dozens of public and private construction sites scattered across Davao city."


This informative article is long so if really you want to be enlightened, just read it here:
You must register or login to view this.
I get your point, pero ginawa ko ung thread kasi may tanong ako about sa nakita ko, binasa ko ung info na sinabi mo and i will review it. Pero what about ung sa tanong ko sir totoo po ba na pag mamayari ng gobyerno ung mga malalaking company tulad ng PLDT and MWSS ano po reason bat naging private sya ? Wag tayo masyado lumayo sa topic
 

-Kyle-

Honorary Poster
A awinahe And ung sa issue ng manila water and maynilad pabor ka ba sa contract na ginawa ni pangilinan and ayala ? Ano sa tingin mo dapat ba na hawakan ng gobyerno ung maynilad or gawin paring private?
 

awinahe

Forum Veteran
A awinahe And ung sa issue ng manila water and maynilad pabor ka ba sa contract na ginawa ni pangilinan and ayala ? Ano sa tingin mo dapat ba na hawakan ng gobyerno ung maynilad or gawin paring private?
with a good transparent government, I think it's better if run by the government... but with our sh...ty governments maybe a private company is better.
Regarding the water contracts, they were started under F.Ramos
 

awinahe

Forum Veteran
I get your point, pero ginawa ko ung thread kasi may tanong ako about sa nakita ko, binasa ko ung info na sinabi mo and i will review it. Pero what about ung sa tanong ko sir totoo po ba na pag mamayari ng gobyerno ung mga malalaking company tulad ng PLDT and MWSS ano po reason bat naging private sya ? Wag tayo masyado lumayo sa topic
Not masyado ma;lyo sa topic as in your post it is said that Aquino sold our assets to private companies... I just wanted to show that duterte is doing it now... so dds kayo parin?
 

-Kyle-

Honorary Poster
Not masyado ma;lyo sa topic as in your post it is said that Aquino sold our assets to private companies... I just wanted to show that duterte is doing it now... so dds kayo parin?
According to your post walang assets na binagay ang government natin ngayon ibang iba sa ginawa ng Aquino dati na lahat ginawang private. Walang pag mamayari ng government ang binigay nya.
 

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